The Passenger

Art Science and Philosophy

woodpaneledshoes:

Charles Mingus and his band (pictured: Horace Parlan, John Handy, and Booker Ervin) performing live at the Five Spot Cafe, NYC, 1958 (photos by Dennis Stock)

(Source: bainer)

engineeringhistory:

William Shockley, Walter Brattain and John Bardeen, 1948. The three shared the 1956 Nobel Prize in Physics for the development of the transistor in June of 1948. John Bardeen is the only person to date to have won the Nobel Prize in Physics twice, the second time was in 1972 with Leon Neil Cooper, and John Robert Schrieffer for the development of BCS theory, first microscopic theory of superconductivity.

engineeringhistory:

William Shockley, Walter Brattain and John Bardeen, 1948. The three shared the 1956 Nobel Prize in Physics for the development of the transistor in June of 1948. John Bardeen is the only person to date to have won the Nobel Prize in Physics twice, the second time was in 1972 with Leon Neil Cooper, and John Robert Schrieffer for the development of BCS theory, first microscopic theory of superconductivity.

Light and matter are both single entities, and the apparent duality arises in the limitations of our language. It is not surprising that our language should be incapable of describing the processes occurring within the atoms, for, as has been remarked, it was invented to describe the experiences of daily life, and these consist only of processes involving exceedingly large numbers of atoms. Furthermore, it is very difficult to modify our language so that it will be able to describe these atomic processes, for words can only describe things of which we can form mental pictures, and this ability, too, is a result of daily experience. Fortunately, mathematics is not subject to this limitation, and it has been possible to invent a mathematical scheme — the quantum theory — which seems entirely adequate for the treatment of atomic processes; for visualisation, however, we must content ourselves with two incomplete analogies — the wave picture and the corpuscular picture.